Ripe Mangoes Gojju/Curry

What kind of dish is Ripe Mango Gojju/Curry? I believe all my South Indian friends know everything about this dish. I will tell you how I first got introduced to this summer fruit mango dish…

Around two years back my dear friend Padmaja and I had gone to attend a housewarming ceremony of our mutual friend Poornima’s house. Generally in South India menu on such occasions is kept traditional. Amongst the dishes there was this one dish which was prepared from semi-ripe mangoes. It was such a delicious dish that I was amazed that something so good could be prepared with ripened mangoes other than Mangoshake (aamras).

Later I asked Poornima about the dish and she told that it is called Ripe Mangoes Gojju. In Kannada gojju means curry and is prepared with special small mangoes that are sweet and sour in taste. Noticing our interest Poornima generously packed Gojju for Padmaja and me.

Subsequently Padmaja and I decided to give it a try at home but I completely forgot about this.

Now mango season is back and Padmaja and I were talking when we suddenly recalled the house warming feast and the ripe mango gojju. We both decided that we were going to prepare the dish this summer. Padmaja belongs to the beautiful coastal city of Mangalore, so she prepared this Gojju in a complete traditional manner with curry leaves and more towards the salty side to be relished with rice.

I couldn’t find the same quality of mangoes which are required to prepare mango gojju, but I got small size mangoes and I went ahead with the preparation. As curry leaves are not much appreciated by Manish and Apoorva, I instead used fresh mint leaves and dry mint powder. Mine was a little towards the sweet version than the salty one. So it had sweet, sour, salty and chirpy taste. I kept it in the fridge and after 3 hours it was the best homemade summer beverage!! It was really refreshing and delicious. I was  glad that now to beat the summer heat I have one more wonderful cooling recipe. Isn’t it nice to explore different food cultures around us!!!

Ingredients :

Small size firm mangoes (sweet and sour in taste), two crushed green chillies, fresh chopped mint leaves, oil, rai (tiny mustard seeds), curry leaves, sugar, white salt, black salt, dry roasted cumin seeds powder, dry mint powder and water to boil mangoes.

Process :

Wash mangoes nicely and boil them in water (half soaked) till they are tender.

Don’t throw away the boiled water. Peel mangoes and with the help of knife or flat spatula take out all the pulp from the peeled skin of mangoes. Mix this pulp in boiled water. Now discard the peeled skin and squeeze out some pulp from the seed of mangoes too (but not completely).

This pulp would be having a lot of fiber – so grind it in the mixer along with sugar. Sugar volume should be such that the natural sweet taste of mangoes is also retained.

Add rest of the ingredients. White and black salt are added to enhance the taste. Mint leaves, mint powder and dry cumin powder enhance the  soothing fresh flavor. Crushed green chilies and tadka or seasoning in the end with oil and tiny rai or mustard seeds will give it a touch of Gojju.

Mix everything nicely, keep it in the fridge to cool down and later refresh yourself with this slightly tweaked version of traditional Ripe Mangoes Gojju. You can add some more water later if you want to have thin consistency.

 

 

Kachhi keiri ka pana/panna (raw mango beverage)

Summer brings many childhood memories of spending time with friends after exams. These include gulping one big watermelon with your cousins, having chilled musk melons early in the morning, munching grapes whole day, drinking Mangoshake (aamras), preparing sharbat (beverages) with Rasna and Roohafza, and drinking my favorite kachhi kairi ka pana with smoky flavor!!

 

Kachhi kairi is raw mango and pana/panna is beverage which is prepared by either boiling or roasting raw mango. At my parents’ house we had traditional chulha (stove) and my mother used to roast raw mangoes on that. This roasting method gives wonderful charred flavor to the drink.

The other method is to simply boil raw mangoes and prepare this beverage. Kairi ka pana is a refreshing summer drink and adding fresh mint leaves enhances its already wonderful taste. It has sweet, salty and tangy taste and jaggery can be used instead of sugar. After preparing you can add a few ice cubes or leave it in the fridge till it is chilled.

To prepare kairi ka pana, always buy firm raw mangoes. If you will just keep on postponing the preparation for 2-3 days, kairi will ripen because of summer heat and will turn sweet. The same happened with me, so if you will see the pictures, the pulp has slight yellow colour. But as the taste of the pulp was still tangy, I went ahead with the rest of the process.

Ingredients :

Raw mangoes (kairie), sugar powder, white salt, black salt, red chilli powder, dry cumin seeds powder, dry mint powder and fresh mint leaves.

Use all dry ingredients as per your taste buds. Sugar or jaggery is added so that the extra tangy taste of raw mango can be balanced. Therefore, sugar gets added a lot more than the other ingredients. Rest of the ingredients are added to enhance the flavor. Add them in small quantities and check the taste from time-to-time and adjust according to your liking. My personal suggestion is to go generous with mint and roasted cumin seeds powder.

Process :

Wash and boil or roast kairie (raw mangoes) till they are become soft. Don’t throw away the water in which kairie is boiled.

Let them cool down completely and peel off the skin.

Take out all the pulp and mix it in boiled water.

If you are using granulated sugar, pour this pulp and sugar in mixer and grind it till sugar is mixed thoroughly. If using hand blander, use powdered sugar. Pour this mixture in a pan.

Add other dry ingredients, mix them well, taste and if you are satisfied with the ratio of all ingredients, add finely chopped green mint leaves.

Mix it well and kachhi kairi ka pana is ready to beat the summer heat 🔥.

 

 

Bottle gourd/doodhi/louki/gheeya/ soup

Bottle gourd soup or lauki ka soup is generally not a welcome soup by family members. Generally it is given to sick persons for them to gain strength and to keep the digestion in control.

But have you ever tried bottle gourd soup with tomatoes🍅 🍅.

Tomatoes add wonderful flavor to the soup along with shallots.

Bottle gourd and tomato combo goes very well. If I prepare bottle gourd in simple curry form or with chana daal, then I add tomato puree in it. In Louki ke kofte ki sabzi Lauki ke kofte ki sabzi (grated bottle gourd dumplings in curry)  also we use tomatoes for puree. With the addition of tomatoes no one is going to say no to this wonderful, nutritious soup. But if because of some health reasons or unavailability of tomatoes you are not able to add tomatoes, add some lemon juice in the soup. Lemon juice also helps in enhancing the taste of bottle gourd.

I have a few more soup posts in the blog. If you are interested, can check them also…

Tomato Soup

Carrot tomato soup

Ingredients:

Bottle gourd 200 gm

Tomatoes 100 gm

Shallots 40 gm

Butter 1 - 2 tbsp (optional)

Salt as per your taste.

Black pepper as per your taste.

Water 4 – 5 cups

Some points to remember:

  1. Try to avoid ripen bottle gourd which has big seeds in it. Select complete raw bottle gourd.
  2. Vegetable stock can be used along with water. But I preferred to use only water as it helped in enhancing the taste of tomatoes, shallots and bottle gourd.
  3. Generally cornflour is used to increase thickness in soups. But because of nice pulp of bottle gourd, this soup was anyhow quite thick. So we don’t need to add cornflour.
  4. Regular onions can also be used in place of shallots.
  5. Cream can be added during serving to enhance the taste and flavor.

Process:

Wash all three veggies and peel shallots and onion. Next, chop all in small pieces.

In a pan or pressure cooker boil them in one cup of water and 1/8th tsp salt till all veggies become soft.

After boiling, grind them in a mixer and sieve the pulp to avoid seeds in soup. Add rest of the water to this thick pulp and boil it on sim heat for 10 – 15 minutes. Add butter and salt and pepper according to your taste.

Serve hot soup with croutons or bread sticks and enjoy your winter evening!

 

Stuffed brinjal/eggplant/aubergines (Bharva baigan)

During my childhood, I had seen that most kids used to hate brinjals. On the other hand, I had always liked them and my mother cooks them wonderfully! Brinjal is a very simple vegetable and this quality gives us an opportunity to cook it in many different ways. Stuffed Brinjals/Eggplant/Aubergines and Baigan ka bharta (roasted balloon eggplant/brinjal cooked with spices) are two varieties which I have already posted in the blog. This new recipe of stuffed brinjal or Bharva Banigan is done with thin vertical purple brinjals. I had always liked this variety of brinjals and when my mother used to chop them for dinner, I used to eat one or two pieces raw. Sounds crazy, but I always had this habit of eating a few vegetables raw whenever my mother would be chopping them (there are cows, and then there is me!!).

In my previous stuffed brinjal recipe I had used only spices for stuffing, but here along with spices I have also used onions. Try this recipe – you are sure going to love it.

Ingredients:

Brinjals, finely chopped onion and green chillies, grated ginger

spices; salt, red chilli powder, coriander powder, turmeric powder, garam masala powder, dry mango powder, coarsely ground fennel seeds, asafoetida and oil.

Process:

Wash brinjals and keep them separate.


Finely chop onions and green chillies and grate ginger. You can add garlic too.

Heat 1 tbsp oil in a pan and add onion, chilly and ginger mix and saute it till onions are transparent.

Reduce heat to sim and add all spices and saute everything for 5 minutes . If required add 1 tbsp oil more, but not more than that.

Cut brinjal vertically and slightly deep with the help of knife and fill in ready onion massala.

Heat 4 tbsp oil in a non stick or heavy bottomed pan and keep all stuffed brinjals in it and cover that. Keep the heat on sim and if available, use extra small burner, so that brinjals can be cooked nicely on sim heat.

In between, keep turning them upside down for even cooking till brinjals are soft from all sides. I like the outer skin of brinjal little bit crisp so I cook them bit more .

Serve these delicious stuffed brinjals as a side dish with rice or roti and enjoy your meal!!