Mooli ki bhujiya (sabzi)

Mooli ki Bhujiya sounds as if we are talking about a snack recipe. But when we add leaves and roots of radish together and prepare vegetable (sabzi), it is called Mooli ki bhujiya (sabzi). In North India, radish is available only during winters. But, here in Bangalore, good quality radish is available during summers too.

Initially, around 16 years back when we shifted to Bangalore, it was really difficult to find radish with leaves. Leaves used to be cut and thrown away from radish by the vegetable shop owners. But now in front of my apartment a vegetable vendor sells radish with all the leaves. In fact, whenever I show interest to buy leaves too, the sellers are amused and give me plenty of leaves free of cost. Probably they are relieved that their garbage is being cleaned up by customers!!

This sabzi requires raw radish – so be careful while choosing. Radish will not remain tender when it starts ripening and will not taste good. Remove the stems if they are too thick and attached with the leaves. Use soft leaves and soft raw radish.

I have one more recipe with radish in the blog – if you are interested can take a look…Mooli ka paratha (wheat flour flat bread stuffed with spicy radish)

There are a few more posts on different vegetables in the blog. You can check this link to look at them Vegetables (Curries).

Ingredients

Radish with leaves

Oil 2 tbsp
Tiny mustard seeds 1/4 tsp
Cumin seeds 1/4 tsp
Asafoetida 1/8 tsp

Red chilli powder 1 tsp
Coriander powder 1 +1/2 tbsp
Turmeric powder 1/2 tsp
Green chillies chopped 2
Salt as per your taste

Process :

Take radish and leaves, wash them nicely in the running water and chop them separately.

Heat oil in a wok and crackle tiny mustard seeds, cumin seeds and asafoetida.

Add chopped radish and leaves along with all spices except salt – mix this nicely and cover for 5 minutes.

When we prepare leafy vegetables, their volume gives an impression of large quantity. But leaves shrink while cooking – so always add salt once the leaves settle down after 5 minutes of cooking.

Now add salt – mix it well and again cover the wok.

Keep on stirring sabzi continually till radish becomes tender and all moisture dries out. Mooli ki Bhujiya (sabzi) is ready!

 

Instant Mango Pickle

This is the first time I tried Instant Mango Pickle (kairie ka achaar). Honestly speaking, this is the first time I have tried any variety of pickle. The idea of trying aam ka achar (mango pickle) was there in my mind this summer, but probably kept postponing because I would be a beginner and that made me hesitant. I love pickles where everything is mixed and kept in achaar ki barni (vessel specifically meant for pickles), tied up with a piece of cloth and each day kept in sun heat for at least 10-12 days till pickle is ready!! As kids we used to be so tempted to taste the pickle but our mom’s strict instructions always kept us away. I love pickles, but I also get throat infections easily, so I was not very keen to try my mom’s recipes for any pickles. One day Manish insisted to try at least Instant Mango Pickle. Last year we had tasted this instant mango pickle through my dear neighbour friend Subbalaksmi who had given me the wonderful recipe of Raw Mango Chutney with Jaggery. Once again I requested her to give me the recipe for pickle and finally I tried a pickle recipe for the first time!

Through this recipe we can prepare pickle in 12 hours if weather is really hot. Nowadays Bangalore is cold because of monsoon, so mine got ready in 24 hours. This is Instant pickle. So once it is ready, we have to keep it in the fridge. How long we can keep it? Don’t worry about that. It is so tasty and easy to prepare that it will be over very soon and there will be a demand to prepare it again!!

Ingredients :

Raw mangoes 2

Rock salt 2 tsp

Turmeric powder 1 +1/2 tsp

Red chilli powder 2 tsp

Oil 2 tbsp

Mustard seeds 1+1/2 tsp

Asafoetida    a pinch

Process :

Wash and cut raw mangoes into 2 pieces, remove the seed, and chop them along with the peel in tiny pieces.

Keep them in a bowl, add rock salt and turmeric powder and mix it nicely. Cover the bowl and keep it  at any safe place in your kitchen till the evening. If you get sunlight in your house, keep the bowl there. Sunlight will help in reducing the time in which mango pieces become soft. In between keep on stirring them for 5-6 times. You might notice some water in the bowl later. Don’t worry about it. If weather is pretty hot, till the evening, raw mango pieces will turn soft. If it is a cold or rainy day, let them soften for whole night also.

In the morning taste mango pieces. If required, add a little more salt along with red chilli powder. Heat oil in a pan, splatter mustard seeds and asafoetida and let this seasoning cool down a bit. Then add in the bowl of raw mango pieces. Mix it well and Instant Mango Pickle is ready!!!

 

Kairie ki loungi (raw mango dish)

‘Kairie ki loungi’  (raw mango dish) sunte hee muh mei paani aa jaata hai (mouth starts watering after listening to the name of the dish). This dish is prepared with raw mangoes.  Kairie ki loungi is one of my favorite raw mango dishes during summer since childhood. It is a side dish with your regular meals or you can have it with paratha during breakfast.

Sour taste of raw mango is balanced by sugar/jaggery, salt and red chilli powder. Seasoning with fennel seeds gives sweet fragrant flavor. When sugar melts and gets mixed with the rest of the ingredients, the look of the dish and taste reaches to another level altogether!! You have beautiful caramelized raw mango dish which will get over by licking directly from the pan. Oh, I can really write a poem on this!!!

Am I exaggerating too much?? Not at all… Try this recipe and experience the wonderful taste of my favorite raw mango dish ‘Loungi’ during summer!!

The whole credit for this recipe goes to my younger sister Nandini. Amongst the three sisters she is the one who started cooking very early. So her culinary skills are excellent. Last year during my Jaipur trip she prepared loungi and since then I have been waiting for the summer season to get back that wonderful taste!!!

You can check one more post from raw magoes in the blog. It is traditional Indian cool summer beverage Kachhi keiri ka pana/panna (raw mango beverage)

Ingredients :

400 gm kairie (raw mango medium sized peeled and sliced)
2 tbsp oil
1 tsp sauf
1 tsp coriander powder
1/2 tsp red chilli powder
1/4 tsp turmeric powder
1/2 tsp salt or as per your taste( can take a mix of white and black salt)
Water 1/4 cup
1/3 cup Sugar

You can reduce or increase the quantity of salt, sugar and chilli powder as per your preference.

For oil, my preference is mustard oil for its pungent flavor.

Process :

Wash, peel and cut raw mangoes in long pieces. The seed of raw mango is tender. While slicing kairie, the seed will also be sliced. Remove the seed after cutting kairie into pieces.

In a broad pan heat oil and crackle funnel seeds.

Add cut pieces of kairie and rest of the spices, except sugar.

Add water, mix everything and cover the pan.

Raw mango gets cooked very soon – so after a minute keep stirring in between. When the kairie is 80% cooked and needs a few more minutes, add sugar and keep stirring very gently till sugar melts. Switch off heat.

Be careful here – don’t let kairie cook completely before adding sugar. If it is completely cooked, it will become mushy when sugar/jagegery is added. Slight crisp and soft pieces of kairi taste really nice.

Loungi wouldn’t last more than a day, but if you want to save it for the next day to eat it with paratha for breakfast, keep it in the fridge.

 

Ripe Mangoes Gojju/Curry

What kind of dish is Ripe Mango Gojju/Curry? I believe all my South Indian friends know everything about this dish. I will tell you how I first got introduced to this summer fruit mango dish…

Around two years back my dear friend Padmaja and I had gone to attend a housewarming ceremony of our mutual friend Poornima’s house. Generally in South India menu on such occasions is kept traditional. Amongst the dishes there was this one dish which was prepared from semi-ripe mangoes. It was such a delicious dish that I was amazed that something so good could be prepared with ripened mangoes other than Mangoshake (aamras).

Later I asked Poornima about the dish and she told that it is called Ripe Mangoes Gojju. In Kannada gojju means curry and is prepared with special small mangoes that are sweet and sour in taste. Noticing our interest Poornima generously packed Gojju for Padmaja and me.

Subsequently Padmaja and I decided to give it a try at home but I completely forgot about this.

Now mango season is back and Padmaja and I were talking when we suddenly recalled the house warming feast and the ripe mango gojju. We both decided that we were going to prepare the dish this summer. Padmaja belongs to the beautiful coastal city of Mangalore, so she prepared this Gojju in a complete traditional manner with curry leaves and more towards the salty side to be relished with rice.

I couldn’t find the same quality of mangoes which are required to prepare mango gojju, but I got small size mangoes and I went ahead with the preparation. As curry leaves are not much appreciated by Manish and Apoorva, I instead used fresh mint leaves and dry mint powder. Mine was a little towards the sweet version than the salty one. So it had sweet, sour, salty and chirpy taste. I kept it in the fridge and after 3 hours it was the best homemade summer beverage!! It was really refreshing and delicious. I was  glad that now to beat the summer heat I have one more wonderful cooling recipe. Isn’t it nice to explore different food cultures around us!!!

Ingredients :

Small size firm mangoes (sweet and sour in taste), two crushed green chillies, fresh chopped mint leaves, oil, rai (tiny mustard seeds), curry leaves, sugar, white salt, black salt, dry roasted cumin seeds powder, dry mint powder and water to boil mangoes.

Process :

Wash mangoes nicely and boil them in water (half soaked) till they are tender.

Don’t throw away the boiled water. Peel mangoes and with the help of knife or flat spatula take out all the pulp from the peeled skin of mangoes. Mix this pulp in boiled water. Now discard the peeled skin and squeeze out some pulp from the seed of mangoes too (but not completely).

This pulp would be having a lot of fiber – so grind it in the mixer along with sugar. Sugar volume should be such that the natural sweet taste of mangoes is also retained.

Add rest of the ingredients. White and black salt are added to enhance the taste. Mint leaves, mint powder and dry cumin powder enhance the  soothing fresh flavor. Crushed green chilies and tadka or seasoning in the end with oil and tiny rai or mustard seeds will give it a touch of Gojju.

Mix everything nicely, keep it in the fridge to cool down and later refresh yourself with this slightly tweaked version of traditional Ripe Mangoes Gojju. You can add some more water later if you want to have thin consistency.

 

 

Kaashifal ka raita (pumpkin raita)

Kaashifal ka raita reminds me of winter season at my parents’ house in Jaipur. Compared to Bangalore, Jaipur is lot more colder during winter season. But despite very cold foggy mornings and chilled nights, Jaipur gets bright sunshine during the day.

My mother used to prepare a variety of raita each day for our lunch during winter season. Among all other varieties my favourite was Pumpkin Raita.

Kaashifal ka Raita has amazing blend of flavours. Sweetness of  yellow pumpkin is complimented by slight sourness of curd and a mix of red chilli powder, roasted jeera (cumin) powder and dry mint powder gives a wonderful taste of warm and cold spices.

Around 2 months back my daughter Apoorva was diagnosed with Ulcerative Collites. It was a shock for us as she is just 17 and we have always been very careful with our food habits. And till three years back Apoorva had no special  interest or liking in food. She was not able to tolerate spices at all. Can you believe that she never used to eat Pizza!! Slowly her taste buds started changing and she was enjoying and experimenting different types of cuisines at home and outside. Though we hardly eat outside or use frozen food but teenagers along with their friends love to eat outside and explore different cuisines. All of a sudden food related experiments came to a halt. Now she is restricted to rice, curd, lentils, lots of buttermilk, tender coconut water, vegetables without seeds, no raw fruits except banana, boiled apple, nothing with high fibre, no chilly of any variety, no milk products except curd,no fats and no sweet. Anything which causes heat is completely restricted till she recovers and recovery might take 6-7 months. Her board exams are on and so we are following food restrictions very strictly and are trying to to do some experiments with the given choices of ingredients.

Pumpkin as a veggie is Apoorva’s favourite, so I decided to introduce to her pumpkin raita too. I believe with such limited choice of food, she liked it as it was a change from having plain curd every day. Though we are not adding red chilli powder which gives it a wonderful taste, I am mentioning it in the list of ingrediants.

For raita, curd or butter milk can be used. Remember, this buttermilk is different from what we use in baking. In India buttermilk is a mix of curd and water and it is churned nicely.

Ingredients:

Pumpkin, thick buttermilk, salt, roasted cumin (jeera) seeds powder,dry mint powder, red chilli powder and asafoetida. 

Process :

Remove thick peel from pumpkin, wash it and and slice it into small pieces. 

Boil these pumpkin pieces in water till they are soft. 

Squeeze out the water completely from the boiled pumpkin and mash it as a smooth puree. 

If using curd, then churn it with churner and in a big bowl add pumpkin puree and  mix it nicely in the curd. 

Add salt, red chilli powder, roasted cumin (jeera) powder,dry mint powder and a pinch of asafoetida. Mix it nicely and sprinkle little bit of red chilli powder and roasted cumin powder on top of the raita just before serving. 

 

 

Stuffed Baati (baked)

Stuffed Baati is a traditional Rajasthani savoury dish. It is prepared with wheat flour, and stuffed with boiled potatoes mix. Traditionally,  stuffed baati is a roasted dish and later it is immersed in melted desi ghee (clarified butter) which gives it a wonderful combination of crispy outer layer and softer insides.

We get a separate baati oven to roast as now in our modern kitchen roasting baati in traditional way is not possible. For more information on traditional method of preparing plain baati, you can refer my  earlier post  Plain Baati (traditional Rajasthani food)

Generally, I prepare this complete traditional Rajasthani platter of besan ke ladoo (Besan ke ladoo),  panchmel daal (Panchmel daal), baati and churma – wheat flour (Churma (wheat flour)) and besan (Besan churma) – on the occasion of Ganesh Chaturthi festival. But this time, after a few days of  Ganesha festival there was a potluck arranged at my husband’s office. So I decided to send panchmel daal and stuffed baked baati. As I don’t have baati oven till now, I baked them in my OTG.

Oh, it was a lot of baati baking day!!

I baked stuffed baati dough in two batches – initial 60 baatis for potluck and another 30 in second batch for our lunch and some for my neighbouring friends.

It was a big tiring day, but in the afternoon my husband’s message refreshed me and I was re-energised!

My dish was appreciated by all and was ranked first under vegetarian dishes category 💃💃💃💃

Try these stuffed baked baatis once and feel free to at add any stuffing of your choice. It could be mixed veggies with paneer (cottage cheese), cheese, fresh grated coconut or roasted gram flour with spices too.

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Ingredients:

Wheat flour 3 cups
Baking soda 1/2 tsp
Baking powder 1/2 tsp
Salt 1 tsp
Carom seeds (ajwain) 1+1/2 tsp
Water 1+1/2 cup (reduce or increase 1-2 tbsp as per requirement,normal temperature)
Oil/desi ghee (clarified butter) 4 tbsp
Melted Desi ghee 1/4 cup (extra)
Boiled Potato mixture with spices

Process:

Collect all dry ingredients in a big vessel so that kneading is easy.

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Pour melted ghee and with the help of water knead smooth dough.

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Peel boiled potatoes and add salt, red chilli powder, asafoetida, garam masala, dry mango powder, grated ginger, finely chopped green chillies and green coriander leaves. If you like the taste, can add little bit of chaat masala too.

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Mash potatoes and mix everything together. Potatoes mix is ready.

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Divide the dough in 40-45 gms balls and roll them smooth.

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Flatten one ball of dough with the help of rolling pin or simply with your fingers.

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Place in between little bit of potato mix and close it.

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Roll this filled baati gently in between your palms to make it smooth. This way complete all baatis and place them in your ghee greased baking tray. Brush them with melted ghee nicely and bake in a pre-heated oven at 185 degrees for 30 to 40 minutes or till they are nicely brown.

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Once again apply melted ghee all over the baked baatis and relish them with panchmel daal or as a snack with your tea.

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